An in-depth look into the role of Martin Bormann, Hitler’s secretary and eventual head of the Nazi Party Chancellery

(Credit goes to an anon from https://saidit.net/s/debatealtright/comments/bgnb/does_anyone_here_have_rare_hitler_or_nazi_related/1453e)

Some religious fanatics go to such extreme lengths that they maintain that all memoirs/diaries from those who knew Hitler are tampered with, and only his manifesto and speeches can be relied upon. Clearly they have not learnt to read between the lines.

In Mein Kampf, Hitler wrote that sometimes what he says does not reflect his actual beliefs: “In those days what happened almost always was that I presented myself before an assembly of men who believed the opposite of what I wished to say and who wanted the opposite of what I believed in.”


He also admitted in a public address to party members: “I do not always do things as others would like me to – yes, I try to find out what the others probably think and, then, I do the opposite.” (November 8, 1942)


According to Alfred Rosenberg, “He was not at all like the representatives of other parties. Where the latter appealed to the interests of their listeners, who all belonged to a certain definite group, by promising to press their interests before all others, Hitler invariably spoke for the absent ones.”

Dedicated and single-minded… He was single-minded in his work for his Führer, to whom he devoted himself. His single-mindedness was not for his own benefit but was really for Hitler and his ideas because he believed they were Germany’s salvation.”


“I think that, for my father, Hitler was the person… to whom he devoted his life and all his energy… in an act of personal sacrifice, as it were, he dedicated his life to him. It was perhaps greater than the bond with his family.”

– Martin Adolf Bormann (Bormann’s son)

Hans Baur –
At that some shocked guest declared: ‘But my Führer, you really shouldn’t compare Stalin with yourself. Why, he was a bank-robber!’ Hitler brusquely rejected the observation and declared that if Stalin had actually robbed any banks, then it had been not for himself but for his party and his movement – which was a very different thing, and not to be regarded as bank-robbery in the ordinary way.

[Bolshevik] Alexandra Kollontai –
Make Way for Winged Eros

The ancient world considered friendship and “loyalty until the grave” to be civic virtues. The person who accomplished great deeds and risked his life for his friend was considered a hero and his action most virtuous”, while a man risking himself for the sake of a woman he loved would have been reproached or even despised.

[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler, p.g. 484
Bei einer Unterbrechung — er wurde zum Telefon gebeten — sagte ich leise zu Bormann: Das muß doch festgehalten werden, das ist doch von größter Bedeutung! Darauf Bormann: Ich versuche es, schon seit einiger Zeit.
During an interruption – he was asked to come to the phone – I said quietly to Bormann to Bormann: “This must be recorded, it is of the utmost importance!” Bormann replied: “I have been trying for some time.”
_____

Heinz Linge –
The Elser case was something special for him without a doubt. Since the Nuremberg trials we have come to understand how the lives of people in Hitler’s Germany counted for very little. This can be confirmed by reading the death sentences from that time. Thus we have a mystery how Elser, whom Hitler ought to have wanted dead, stayed alive almost to the end when the men and women around Graf von Stauffenberg in 1944 were hanged like cattle. Workers who went through thick and thin to ‘follow the mismanaged nobility’ were also lost to Hitler in principle, while Thälmann the German communist leader and Elser were for him ‘men of character’ in whom he saw much to be admired. It seems to me that this aspect of his personality lacks research.


Joseph Goebbels –
Diaries (English)
[May 9, 1943] Naturally he would very much like to have me in the Munich post, but of course there can be no question of that. This talk made us realize anew how extremely rare are men of real caliber. If you have to fill two posts of decisive importance in public life you can search with a lantern and won’t find anybody. . . .

These two hours with the Führer were very beautiful and engendered confidence. Bormann acted exceedingly loyally. I must say that the criticism leveled at him is for the most part unjustified. When you compare what he keeps in the way of promises and what Goering keeps, Goering is undoubtedly at a disadvantage. There is no longer any real dependence on Goering. He is tired and somewhat washed up.


Heinz Linge –

Memoir

Bormann was an uncouth and unbelievably hyperactive personality, a strong personality whose influence even on Hitler I had occasion to remark often.


[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler

With a lively alertness and immense industriousness, he [Bormann] worked through piles of files, dictated and phoned without a break. He had the endurance of a fighting bull. (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)


Wolf Rüdiger Hess –

Bormann was an ox with a huge capacity for work. My father preferred to go skiing and so on.


Hitler –
Table Talk (Jochmann), August 12, 1942


•Admiral Schröder made the best impression of all. Such an energetic bull!

Schröder hat den besten Eindruck gemacht von allen. So ein energiegeladener Bulle!


•Admiral Schröder was one of the most energetic men, a fanatic, uncompromising!

Schröder einer der tatkräftigsten Männer, ein Fanatiker, kompromißlos!

•If I catch a man like Schröder somewhere, I pull him out immediately.
Wenn ich so einen Mann wie Schröder irgendwo erwische, den ziehe ich augenblicklich heraus.


Hitler –
Table Talk (Jochmann), August 28, 1942

[On Admiral Horthy] The old man has the fanatical will to stay healthy. He is a bull, in former times probably the bravest officer in the Austrian navy. Their aristocracy is of German blood in the main thing.

Der Alte hat den fanatischen Willen, gesund zu bleiben. Er ist ein Bulle, früher wohl der tapferste Offizier in der österreichischen Marine. Ihre Aristokratie ist in der Hauptsache deutschen Blutes.

Herbert Döhring –

Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

Bormann is a rogue and a philistine,” said Hitler, “but I haven’t got anyone more efficient. I know that he’ll carry out every order right down to the last detail and see it through to the end.”


Heinrich Hoffman –
Memoir

On one occasion in 1944, when I returned to Headquarters from Vienna, I was having dinner with Hitler and I gave him a message from Baldur von Schirach.
‘Schirach,’ I said, ‘protests against Bormann’s accusation that it is now too late to think of organising the anti-aircraft defences of Vienna; he told me that a few weeks after the beginning of the war he had completed his plans for this purpose, but had been instructed by Bormann to take no steps, as premature action would only unsettle the population of the city unnecessarily.’

Hitler seemed to regard this message as an implied criticism of Bormann, for he rounded on me sharply. ‘Get this quite clear in your own mind, Hoffmann, and tell it to your son-in-law, too,’ he cried. ‘To win this war I have need of Bormann! It’s perfectly true that he is both ruthless and brutal. He’s a bull, and not for nothing has he given his son the nickname of “the bull”; but the fact remains, one after the other, everybody has failed in their implicit obedience to my commands – but Bormann, never!’

His voice rose to a scream; he looked searchingly into my face, as if his words held some special application to me personally. ‘Everyone, I don’t care who he may be, must understand clearly this one fact: whoever is against Bormann is also against the State!’


[Hoffmann then goes on to portray Hitler as threatening to shoot those who opposed Bormann. This account needs confirmation in German and corroboration from others.]


Hitler –
Table Talk (Jochmann), November 2, 1941

These people look at everything mentally, they analyze everything. You can’t make history with that alone. I need the brutal natures, which are ready to draw the conclusion from a realization, a healthy, natural aptitude following the primitive side of brutality, the willpower. The [resilence, power of resistance] of the human being belongs to the character side. It becomes wonderful when intellectual/spiritual superiority is added to it.


Alles betrachten diese Menschen geistig, alles analysieren sie. Damit allein kann man nicht Geschichte machen. Ich brauche die brutalen Naturen, die bereit sind, aus einer Erkenntnis die Konsequenz zu ziehen, eine gesunde, natürliche Anlage nach der primitiven Seite der Brutalität, der Willenskraft. Die Widerstandskraft des Menschen gehört zur charakterlichen Seite. Wunderbar wird es, wenn dazu dann geistige Überlegenheit kommt.


Christa Schroeder –

Memoir
Hitler, always full of praise for Martin Bormann, once said:

“Where others need all day, Bormann does it for me in two hours, and he never forgets anything! . . . Bormann’s reports are so precisely formulated that I only need to say Yes or No. With him I get through a pile of files in ten minutes for which other men would need hours. If I tell him, remind me of this or that in six months, I can rest assured that he will do so. He is the exact opposite of his brother who forgets every task I give him.”


[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler

I was often present at that time when Bormann reported; he did so in a matter-of-fact and concentrated way, with all the pros and cons, mostly about very important matters. Sometimes, when persons and happenings were involved that I was familiar with, I could see how clearly and correctly it had been reported. (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)

Christa Schroeder –

Memoir

Bormann came to Hitler not only well prepared with his files but was also so in tune with Hitler’s way of thinking that he could spare him long-winded explanations. Anyone who knew how Hitler did things will realise that this was decisive for him!


Heinz Linge –

Memoir

As a result of his constant attendance upon Hitler, Bormann developed a greater insight into Hitler’s way of thinking than anybody else.

Christa Schroeder –

Memoir
He was neither hungry for power nor the ‘grey eminence’ in Hitler’s entourage. To my mind he was one of the few National Socialists with clean hands, if one may put it that way, for he was incorruptible and came down hard on all corruption he discovered. For his oppressive attitude in this regard he increasingly antagonised corrupt Party members and many others.

Ernst Hanfstaengl –
Memoir
Bormann was still Hess’s assistant. He was tidy, modest and thrifty, and, I thought, a good influence, as he and Hess waged a continuous campaign against corruption in the Party, and Bormann tried to keep orderly accounts.

[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –

Ein Anderer Hitler

Hitler, Berghof, Spring 1944: “Giesler, I need Bormann and his working strength. He relieves me, he is steady, unshakable and an achiever – I can depend on him!” (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)

_____


Hitler –

Table Talk (Jochmann), October 13-14, 1941
Where would I end up if I didn’t find people I trust to do the work I can’t do myself, tough people who I know will do what I would do. The best man for me is the one who troubles me the least, by taking upon himself 95 out of 100 decisions. Of course, there are always cases which ultimately have to be decided by me.


Wohin käme ich, wenn ich nicht Leute meines Vertrauens fände zur Erledigung der Arbeiten, die ich nicht selbst leiten kann, harte Leute, von denen ich weiß, sie greifen so durch, wie ich das tun würde. Der beste Mann ist für mich der, welcher mich am wenigsten bemüht, indem er 95 von 100 Entscheidungen auf sich nimmt. Freilich gibt es immer Fälle, die letztlich von mir entschieden werden müssen.


Joseph Goebbels –
Diaries (English)
[March 27, 1945] The Führer thinks Saur a stronger personalty than Speer. Saur is a tough stayer who, when given a job, will carry it through, if necessary by force. To some extent he is the opposite of Speer. Speer is more of an artist by nature. Admittedly he has great organisational talent but politically he is too inexperienced to be totally reliable in this critical time.


Heinz Linge –

Memoir

Whatever Bormann did was carried through with unscrupulous force. He crushed underfoot anybody in his path. He was one of those persons for whom you instinctively stand even if you met him as a stranger in the street.


Nicolaus von Below –
Memoir

His representative for Army armaments was Saur, an unusually active rival of Speer with an unacceptably ruthless disposition.


Christa Schroeder –
Memoir

Bormann was simply one of the most devoted and loyal of Hitler’s vassals who would often force through ruthlessly and sometimes brutally the orders and directives given by Hitler.


Erich Kempka –
Memoir, Chapter 5

We who spent many years in close proximity to this diabolical personality all hated him. His ruthlessness knew no bounds. Nevertheless, to give the devil his due, he had that kind of genius for work rarely seen on the planet. He would master anything mechanical.

He succeeded in making himself indispensable to Hitler, who was without doubt an intelligent man, for when Hitler gave Bormann an order he knew that of all his devoted servants only Bormann would guarantee to carry it out unconditionally, despite all adverse circumstances, and in the shortest possible time.


Heinz Linge –

Memoir

Hitler found Bormann’s tireless work rate a great help. Often he would emphasise his recognition of it: ‘The Party’s apparatus of command has never worked better.’ No wonder, for every wish and gesture of Hitler’s was interpreted by Bormann as a command.


Erich Kempka –
Memoir

He worked almost day and night without a break and rightfully won the reputation of being a great workhorse.


Heinz Linge –

Memoir

He worked day and night, allowed colleagues and employees no rest and tyrannised them. For the most minor error he would ruthlessly cull a member of staff. He called for a furious work rate and appalled not only his workers and advisers but his adjutants such as Hühner too.


Herbert Döhring –
Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

He worked day and night. Not one construction company escaped his scrutiny. And when the building work slowed down for some reason he ran straight out to see why… “Keep going! Why have you stopped?”


Rochus Misch –
Memoir

The Party leadership had to be passed to somebody else, and Hitler then appointed Martin Bormann as chief of the Party chancellery. In this, Hitler chose the wrong man, in our opinion. ‘Goebbels in, Bormann out,’ we said. We might have admitted that Martin Bormann’s contacts with us were conciliatory to some extent, but nobody had a soft spot for him. Even his own brother did not exist for him, after Albert Bormann had married a woman completely unacceptable in Martin’s eyes.

Goebbels we liked. He was usually cheerful and was man enough to contradict Hitler even if only to turn down a dinner invitation. That impressed us. Meanwhile Bormann always fawned on Hitler. Certainly almost everyone did, but Bormann was the champion at it.

Alfred Rosenberg –
Memoir

Bormann preferred to evade making clear-cut decisions, and usually wrote entirely different opinions from those accepted without protest in conversation. Everybody agreed that he was an unbelievably energetic and tireless worker.

Erich Kemkpa –

Memoir, Chapter 5
When Rudolf Hess was expanding the liaison apparatus between Party and State he noticed Bormann and took him into the staff. After a short while Bormann rose to be Stabsleiter (head of staff) under Hess and had thus achieved his first goal. He belonged in the first team. He remained pleasant and was always ready to be of service to equals and those above him.

Things changed in 1936. After Hitler’s Haus Wachenfeld on the Obersalzberg was rebuilt and expanded into the Berghof, Bormann burst out from his previously modest disguise. Now he just had to have a house on the Obersalzberg.


Laura Schroedel –

Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

In the first years when I worked in the Brown House and Bormann was just chief of staff it was actually quite nice. When Bormann became “Reichsleiter of the Mountain” as he was called then, he had to deal with things on the Obersalzberg… the expropriations and so on. Then Bormann became… we said he was a devil.


Reinhard Spitzy –

Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

Bormann made himself absolutely indispensable and everything worked very smoothly under him. But he was the evil spirit of the place. I personally hate Bormann.


Heinz Linge –
Memoir

On Obersalzberg before the war a large tree was planted on the spot where Hitler took march-pasts in summer. Since he wanted to appear bare-headed without a sun canopy, and the tree was the only way.


Herbert Döhring –
Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

Bormann, being Bormann, saw to it at once. He had a linden tree fetched from somewhere near Munich… The hole had already been dug. On his birthday in 1937 it was planted in the pouring rain. As always he was there to supervise.


Margarethe Mittelstrasser –
Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

Hitler went to Munich for one or two days and when he came back there was just a meadow. It was Bormann’s doing. He turned up with a team of workmen and they slaved away, demolishing, removing and levelling. Nothing was left but grass.


Heinz Linge –
Memoir

His close personal relationship to Hitler, at which he was working doggedly when I joined Hitler’s staff, was achieved by enlarging Hitler’s country house Wachenfeld on Obersalzberg. He arranged finance for this endeavour skilfully by diverting Party funds and gave Hitler, who had no real understanding of money, the feeling that here was somebody who might relieve him of all the burdens in this area with which he did not wish to be encumbered.


Max Hartmann –

Interview, Hitler’s Henchmen S2E6

Money wasn’t a consideration for Bormann. I don’t know where the money came from but he always had plenty, no matter what he used it for.

Erich Kempka – Memoir, Chapter 5

My own relationship with Martin Bormann was tense, from the beginning of his influence until the end of the Reich. He always had some plan afoot to get Hitler to dismiss me. He failed because I had Hitler’s trust. Through my constant personal contact with Hitler I always had the opportunity to put my case in rebuttal of Bormann’s insinuations. Bormann knew how low an opinion I had of him.

•[1938] Here is a small example of how Bormann knew the way to arouse Hitler’s admiration:

•He had an excellent idea of how to make equals feel he was their friend and to have himself appreciated by his superiors.


•He had a cat-like, effusive show of friendliness when it suited his purposes, but when not being nice he was utterly brutal.

•Woe betide the subordinate who fell into disfavour with him. He would persecute that person, filled with hate, for so long as he remained within reach. His behaviour was totally different to those people whom he knew Hitler liked and did not stand in his path. Towards them his friendship was unlimited and he would bend over backwards to make sure Hitler noticed.

•To his underlings he became the most irrational superior. One moment he would treat them in the kindest and most pleasant manner, even giving out presents, and a few minutes later he would be a sadist–belittling, offensive and wounding. Often he would go into such a rage that one would think he has lost his reason.


Heinz Linge –

Memoir

During the French campaign I saw an episode that betrayed his character and nature. He had an assistant in Dr. Heinrich Heim whose serenity stood in stark contrast to that of his master. After Heim had again infuriated Bormann with his unshakeable calm, and withstood a raging diatribe, Heim turned to me impassively and said in a voice that Bormann could not avoid hearing: ‘You see, Herr Linge, he comes from the land. Before this he only had contact with animals. One must therefore overlook it when he roars so loudly.’ Hitler, who was told about this, laughed and promised ‘little Heim’ as he called him, whose knowledge of art he esteemed highly, the post of his personal librarian once the war was over.


[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler
Then we climbed into the forest above the Berghof area. There he showed me his animal world in its free, natural surroundings. An owl was there, a squirrel – what else was jumping around there I cannot remember. He allowed beehives to be brought in to the “Höhe Göll” when the pine trees were blooming. He got enthusiastic about that magnificent mountain. (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)


Epitaph

[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler

I think Adolf Hitler saw him correctly when he told me once: Bormann is like his signature and that is like the “Höhe Göll.” Indeed, Bormann was like the “Höhe Göll” and, like that “Göll,” he sometimes cast a shadow in bright light. Naturally he cast shadows. (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)

Otto Dietrich –

Memoir

Hitler trusted him right down till the end, recognizing in Bormann a blindly obedient instrument who would pass on and execute his commands without the slightest deviation. In Hitler’s will, which bears Bormann’s signature as witness, Hitler recommended him to posterity as his “most loyal Party comrade.”

[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler

During the difficult days in August 1944, when the disloyalty and treason were apparent, Bormann said to me with a very serious meaning:


“I have one task and one goal and that is to serve the Führer as a National Socialist. My only ambition is to do that as well as I am able. The Führer gives me the authority which I need to do it. I activate it, but solely for this my task. Certainly, you have no doubts that I am totally obligated to the Führer. I don’t want anything else but to take some of the heavy burden off his shoulders, and that is not easy!” (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)


https://carolynyeager.net/martin-bormann-close-personal

Martin Bormann Up Close & Personal

as seen by Hermann Giesler
_____

Bormann’s Friendship with Himmler


Christa Schroedel –
Memoir

As far as we could tell, apart from Himmler, everyone was against him. No one liked him. The Gauleiters wanted nothing to do with him. Nor the Reichsleiters either. He had practically no friends.


Alfred Rosenberg –
Memoir

With Himmler, Bormann made a close alliance. Bormann was vitally interested in having Himmler’s reports jibe with his own and, of course, so was Himmler. Both were equally determined not to let anyone break into the closed circle around Hitler, to frustrate the ambition of all other Reichsleiter and ministers, and to let the future take care of the rest.


Erich Kempka –

Memoir, Chapter 5

Between Bormann and Himmler there seemed to be an extraordinarily genial relationship. Outwardly they were the best of friends. When they met they poured praises on each other. Instead of offering the right hand they would clasp both hands jovially.

[Kempka’s assumption: Actually they were archenemies and hated each other. Each envied the other for his influence on Hitler, and were empire building.]


Nicolaus von Below –

Memoir

Incidentally, Goebbels seemed to me the most radical of the National Socialist leaders, whilst Himmler had an eye increasingly to the future in all that he did.
_____

Who was closest to Hitler?



[Hitler’s Architect] Hermann Giesler –
Ein Anderer Hitler
With Speer, everything was practical and calculated – even as a ‘friend’ I considered him a stranger and full of riddles. Now his name appeared, though with a question mark, on the list of ministers of the traitors. (Translated by Wilhelm Kriessmann, Ph.D and Carolyn Yeager)


Christa Schroeder –


Of Speer Hitler once remarked:

He is an artist and his soul is linked to mine. I have the closest human relationship towards him because I understand him so well. He is a man of architecture as I am, intelligent, modest and not a dour military head. I did not think he would master his great objective so well, but he has a great talent for organisation and grew to the task. If I show Speer a plan and give him the job, he reflects a while and then says: ‘Ja, mein Führer, I believe it is possible’, or he objects: ‘Nein, it cannot be done like that’ and then provides the full reason.


Eugene K. Bird –
The Loneliest Man in the World, p.g. 225
[Albert Speer’s Interview with Playboy, June 1971] There was an ultimate coldness about Hitler. I never met anyone else with whom I felt this sense of something missing, this impression that at the core of his being there was just a deadness.

[War Criminal] Winston Churchill –
The Grand Alliance
[On Rudolf Hess] He knew and was capable of understanding Hitler’s inner mind—his hatred of Soviet Russia, his lust to destroy Bolshevism, his admiration for Britain and earnest wish to be friends with the British Empire, his contempt for most other countries. No one knew Hitler better or saw him more often in his unguarded moments.

August Kubizek –
Memoir
•I had the feeling that, in a real, human way, Rudolf Hess was much closer to Hitler than many others and I was glad about this.

•Also, through this visit I was able to confirm an impression I had that the closer to the Chancellor a person stood, the more he had been told about me. Rudolf Hess and Frau Winifred Wagner were the most fully informed about Hitler’s youth and, consequently, about me.


Rudolf Hess –
The Loneliest Man in the World, p.g. 225
‘That’s exactly right about Hitler. What Speer said is correct. I felt it with the Führer as well,’ Hess went on. ‘I discussed this once with Speer and we agreed that there was only a certain point of familiarity you could reach with Hitler, and beyond that point you could not go. It was just as though you had run into an invisible wall. There were times when I felt close to Hitler, but they were very seldom. He was a man who never revealed much warmth. He kept himself aloof. Hitler felt he was destined for great things and I think he felt superior to the people around him and to the common folk. His inner sense of superiority probably made him the way he was.’

Albert Speer –

Memoir
Hess did think there had been one person with whom Hitler had had a closer bond: Dietrich Eckart. But as we talked about it, we decided that the relationship had been, on Hitler’s side, more a matter of admiration for the older man, who was regarded chiefly in anti-Semitic circles as a leading writer, than a friendship.
_____

Soviet Spy Myth

Erich Kempka –
Memoir, Chapter 5

One cannot talk about the fall of the Reich and the death of Hitler without a thorough understanding of [Martin Bormann] in Hitler’s personal circle.

Heinz Linge –
Memoir

Besides Dönitz, Goebbels, Bormann and ourselves, that is to say, his closest circle, Hitler trusted nobody.


Nicolaus von Below –
Memoir

Two others must be mentioned not belonging to Hitler’s personal staff but always close to him – Press officer Reichsleiter Dr. Dietrich, and Reichsleiter Martin Bormann. Until 1941 Bormann was Party Chief and liaison man between Hitler and Hess; later, as Hitler’s secretary, he became involved in matters of policy.

Otto Dietrich –

Memoir

Hitler trusted him right down till the end, recognizing in Bormann a blindly obedient instrument who would pass on and execute his commands without the slightest deviation. In Hitler’s will, which bears Bormann’s signature as witness, Hitler recommended him to posterity as his “most loyal Party comrade.”


Reinhard Gehlen –

The Service
•What Canaris told me concerned the fateful role in which Hitler’s closest confidant, Martin Bormann, was cast in the last war years and in the postwar epoch too. Bormann, who had been Hitler’s personal secretary since early 1943, and chief of the Nazi party organization ever since Rudolf Hess’s flight to Scotland in May 1941, was Moscow’s most prominent informant and adviser from the very moment the campaign against Russia started.

There is no foundation whatever for the allegations which have been made from time to time to the effect that Bormann is alive and well, living in the impenetrable jungle between Paraguay and Argentina, surrounded by heavily armed bodyguards. He crossed to the Russians in May 1945 and was taken back to the Soviet Union.

•During the 1950s I was passed two separate reports from behind the Iron Curtain to the effect that Bormann had been a Soviet agent and had lived after the war in the Soviet Union under perfect cover as an adviser to the Moscow government, and has died in the meantime.

Eugene K. Bird –

The Loneliest Man in the World, p.g. 256

Hess shook his head. ‘Bormann a [Soviet] spy! Amazing. Unbelievable. There was no suspicion of any such thing: if there had been he would certainly no longer have worked with me or the Führer. The position of confidence he had until the end with the Führer shows that no such suspicion arose or if it ever did it must have been proven false.’

Erich Kempka –

Memoir, Appendix 2

Quite apart from these myths and fantasies about Müller and Bormann, the idea that the Bolsheviks had any use for Party bosses or SS people is absurd. Even if the Kremlin had wanted the bulk of the Party members in 1945, they would certainly not have wanted Bormann, who was hated by everybody at the upper levels.

[Kemkpa especially hated Bormann.]

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